Create an engaging 30 minute facilitation to help participants be more aware of their own thinking and reasoning, and inquire into others' thinking and reasoning. Make it practical and engaging

To create an engaging 30-minute facilitation focused on helping participants become more aware of their own thinking and reasoning, and to inquire into others' thinking and reasoning, you can structure the session as follows:

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Welcome participants and introduce the objectives of the session.
  • Briefly explain the concepts of cognitive biases and the Ladder of Inference as tools for understanding thinking and reasoning processes. [Racing Up the Ladder of Inference]
  • Emphasize the importance of self-awareness and self-inquiry in challenging assumptions and improving decision-making. [Seeing What's Not There (The Importance of Missing Data)]

Activity 1: Identifying Cognitive Biases (10 minutes)

  • Explain the concept of cognitive biases and how they can lead to errors in judgment. [Seeing What's Not There (The Importance of Missing Data)]
  • Present a list of common cognitive biases (e.g., availability bias, representative bias, WYSIATI) and provide examples for each. [Seeing What's Not There (The Importance of Missing Data)]
  • Ask participants to reflect individually on a recent decision or judgment they made and identify which biases might have been at play. [Seeing What's Not There (The Importance of Missing Data)]
  • Allow participants to share their reflections in pairs, discussing how awareness of these biases could have altered their decision-making process.

Activity 2: Exploring the Ladder of Inference (10 minutes)

  • Introduce the Ladder of Inference and explain each step: Selection, Interpretation, Conceptualization, and Action. [Racing Up the Ladder of Inference]
  • Break participants into small groups and present them with a scenario. Ask each group to work through the scenario using the Ladder of Inference, identifying what data might be selected, the possible interpretations, and the resulting actions. [Racing Up the Ladder of Inference]
  • Encourage groups to consider alternative data and interpretations that might lead to different actions, highlighting the Reflexive Loop and its impact on reinforcing existing beliefs. [Racing Up the Ladder of Inference]

Conclusion and Reflection (5 minutes)

  • Bring the group back together and facilitate a discussion on the insights gained from the activities.
  • Discuss the importance of mindfulness practices such as meditation to enhance attention management and become more aware of our System 1 and System 2 thinking processes. [Don't Just Do Something, Sit There! (Mindfulness for Busy People)]
  • Encourage participants to consider how they can apply these tools in their daily lives to improve their thinking and reasoning, and to inquire more effectively into others' reasoning. [Why "Truth-Tellers" Fail (and How They Can Succeed)]
  • Close the session by reminding participants that authenticity involves both self-monitoring and the courage to be vulnerable and imperfect. [The Balcony and the Dance Floor]

Throughout the facilitation, be sure to engage participants with questions and encourage them to share their thoughts and experiences. The goal is to make the session practical by applying theoretical concepts to real-life situations and to keep it engaging by involving participants in active discussion and self-reflection.